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Here are a few fan created covers for An Imperial Affliction. Don’t forget to vote for you favorite!

1.)

http://lunlunblog.tumblr.com/

2.)

http://whatdoyouwantmetowrite.tumblr.com/

3.)

http://james-bonds.tumblr.com/

4.)

http://www.redbubble.com/people/andotherpoems/works/8375074-an-imperial-affliction-vintage-cover

5.)

http://www.redbubble.com/people/andotherpoems/works/8344045-an-imperial-affliction-modern-cover?p=poster

6.)

http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/peter-van-houten?before=1326876642

Confused about the Shakespearean Reference? Let’s look closer at the first quatrain.

“Not marble, nor the gilded monuments
Of princes, shall outlive this powerful rhyme;
But you shall shine more bright in these contents
Than unswept stone besmear’d with sluttish time.”

– Sonnet 55

“According to many scholars, sonnet 55 is a poem about time and immortalization. The speaker claims that his beloved will wear out this world to the ending doom.”

Scholars focus on the imagery in this sonnet and specifically the phrase “Sluttish time”

“The Oxford English Dictionary gives “sluttish” two definitions: 1) dirty, careless, slovenly (which can refer to objects and persons of both sexes) and 2) lewd, morally loose, and whorish.”

“According to Fontana, Shakespeare intended the second meaning, personifying and assigning gender to time, making the difference between the young man sonnets and the dark lady sonnets all the more obvious…Helen Vendler expands on the idea of “sluttish time” by examining how the speaker bestows grandeur on entities when they are connected to the beloved but mocks them and associates them with dirtiness when they’re connected with something the speaker hates. She begins by addressing the “grand marble” and “gilded” statues and monuments; these are called this way when the speaker compares them to the verse immortalizing the beloved. However, when compared to “sluttish time” they are “unswept stone besmeared.”

Provided by Wikipedia

Hazel & Gus’ trip to Amsterdam

Writing to the Author!

Has Hazel & Gus’ responses from Peter Van Houten made you want to write a letter to TFIOS author John Green?

To Contact John Green click here, which will take you to the contact page of his website

Photo Credit: Genevieve719

Julius Caesar Act 1 Scene 2

Photo Credit: click here

There’s a certain Slant of light,

Winter Afternoons –

That oppresses, like the Heft

Of Cathedral Tunes –

Heavenly Hurt, it gives us –

We can find no scar,

But internal difference,

Where the Meanings, are –

None may teach it – Any –

‘Tis the Seal Despair –

An imperial affliction

Sent us of the Air –

When it comes, the Landscape listens –

Shadows – hold their breath –

When it goes, ‘tis like the Distance –

On the look of Death –

—    Emily Dickinson, A Certain Slant of Light

Soundtrack for the Fault in Our Stars! Choose between one of these playlists and let us know what you like.

CLICK HERE

– Or –

Check out this Fan Made Song